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Population of Bayan-Olgii and Kazakhs in Mongolia

The population of  Bayan-Ulgii province  is 108,530.  91% of the total population is Kazakh, and the rest is Uriankhai, Khalkh, Tuva, Durvud, and Myangad. It is believed that Mongolian Kazakhs inhabited the near the Western border of Mongolia along the Chinese-Mongolian border since the 1860s.

Mongolian Kazakhs have preserved their language and culture very well. About 70 percent of the population lives by traditional methods, such as herding. Kazakhs are very hardworking, hospitable and friendly people.

After the Mongolian National Liberation Revolution, on July 17, 1912, on behalf of 400 families, 11 Kazakhs, led by Khilan, signed a request letter to get Mongolian citizenship and gave it to Bogd Khan. Bogd Khaan accepted the request of the Kazakhs of Mongolia and issued a decree on November 23, 1912 to allow the Kazakhs to become citizens of Mongolia.

After the decree was issued, the Kazakhs were divided into three counties by territory and tribe and organized into administrative units. In 1940, by the initiative of the head of state Kh. Choibalsan, the first Kazakh province, the present Bayan-Ulgii province, was established.

Bayan-Ulgii province is home to the largest Kazakh tribes, including the Kerey, Naiman, and Uakh, representatives of the Merged, Hongirad, and Toroo are living happily there as well.

The Kazakh people  have their own language and culture, and the Mongolian government has always supported and helped to preserve it. Article 1.1 of chapter 1 of the Constitution of Mongolia provides for the right of Mongolian citizens to receive education in their mother tongue, which gives Kazakhs the right to study and get education in their native language. There are 43 schools and 45 kindergartens in Bayan-Ulgii province, 95% of which teach in Kazakh. The fact that Mongolian-Kazakh bilingual education is taught only in high school is a great sign of the government’s support for respecting ethnic minorities and protecting their heritage. They speak Kazakh, but according to Mongolian law they provide public services in Mongolian.

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